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Integrative Medicine and Nutrition for Diabetes and Alzheimer's Provider (IMNDAC)

Integrative Medicine and Nutrition for Diabetes and Alzheimer's Provider (IMNDAC)

Nutrition and Integrative Medicine for Diabetes, Cognitive Decline, and Alzheimer’s Disease

25.5 CE Credits
Regular Price
999 USD
Special Price
349 USD

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Nutrition and Integrative Medicine for Diabetes, Cognitive Decline, and Alzheimer’s Disease

What You Will Learn

  • The definitions of integrative medicine and functional medicine for diabetes, cognitive decline, and Alzheimer’s prevention management and treatment
  • How to incorporate the spectrum of ethics into your clinical practice of integrative medicine
  • A better understanding of metabolic syndrome (prediabetes) and diabetes, type 1, type 2, and 3
  • To identify the bidirectional effects of psychology & biology on health
  • Define the science of circadian rhythm and its assessment, as it contributes to diabetes and AD spectrum
  • Identify approaches to culturally competent care to enhance rapport and improve outcomes
  • Learn to assess your client/patient for readiness for diverse integrative interventions using motivational methods
  • The science of the “second brain” and its function in the prevention and development of diabetes type 2 and AD
  • Dietary and culinary interventions for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and AD
  • Evidence-based herbal protocols for the treatment of diabetes and AD
  • Nutritional protocols for preventing treating metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and AD
  • Drug-nutrient-herb interactions using assessment software to keep your clients safe
  • Types of exercise and self-care methods to reduce insulin resistance, improve cardiac function and reduce pain in diabetes
  • The role of brain hemisphere coordination exercises for cognitive function and AD
  • The evidence for the role of manual therapies, massage, cranial and visceral manipulation, and electro-therapeutic/stimulation interventions for diabetes and AD
  • The science of toxins, their role in diabetes and AD, and scientific detoxification methods
  • Tailoring lifestyle changes for clients that enhance self-care strategies and success
  • The design of integrative protocols to treat diabetes and most common comorbidities, AD and cognitive decline
  • High-quality, pharmaceutical-grade resources for professionals and family members that have been identified throughout the course
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Course Description

This certification provides you with comprehensive, training in state-of-the-art methods to prevent illness and treat the whole person using evidenced-based methods that are designed to integrate seamlessly and safely in your current practice. This course gives you the tools to enhance and expand your current practice, so that you become an expert in this emerging field.

Whether you are a mental health clinician working with clients who have chronic illnesses like diabetes, memory loss, and cognitive decline, or a physical health provider who wants to increase your toolbox, you will find methods that ensure your patient outcomes will improve.

You learn an integrative approach that equips you with the knowledge, skills and tools to combine evidence-based clinical methods using functional medicine, culinary and herbal medicine, naturopathic medicine, massage and visceral manipulation, yoga therapies and psychological methods with conventional, allopathic, biomedical science and clinical interventions.

This certification gives you what you require to safely recommend supplements and herbs and, to help clients reduce or optimize current medications. You study the role of traumatic stress and how it affects memory and cognition and you spend time in the kitchen learning to prepare herbs and foods. We can give our best advice to clients and patients but without adhering to the protocols any method will fail. This is why I explore the role of motivational interviewing to address self-care and compliance.

Memory loss, agitation, gastroparesis, neuropathy, sundowning and much more are all explored in-depth using natural medicine and functional methods that reduce side effects, thus giving you many options for helping your patients or clients. You explore caregiver health, cultural and social justice and how to build rapport with cultural competency.

When you complete these 25.5 you will join with others who are leading the revolution in integrative medicine and nutrition for chronic illness.

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The Course Includes

Certification

Following successful completion of this course, licensed clinicians become eligible to apply for certification

Lifetime Access

Lifetime Access

Desktop and Mobile Access

Desktop and Mobile Access

Listing in our Referral Network

Listing in our Referral Network

25.5 CE Credits

Your Instructor

Dr. Leslie Korn is a renowned expert in integrative medicine for the treatment of trauma and its physical sequelae including chronic digestive illness, insomnia, pain, substance abuse, diabetes, cognitive decline and “unexplained illnesses”. She has provided over 65,000 hours of clinical care integrating psychotherapy and somatic therapies with nutritional, culinary and herbal medicine. She completed her training at Harvard Medical School and The Harvard School of Public Health. She is licensed and board certified in 4 clinical disciplines. She has been faculty instructor at Harvard in the department of psychiatry and faculty at 2 Naturopathic medical schools. She lived for 25 years in the jungle of Mexico, where she worked alongside indigenous healers and directed a pro bono health center. Her clinical practice focuses on helping clients who are ill with restoring their health and reducing or eliminating medications.

Her mentoring practice focuses on helping clinicians create a successful, integrative medicine, trauma- informed career. Her ethic of compassion and care is informed by feminist values of social justice and her love for dogs.

CE Credits

25.5 CE Credits are approved for Psychologists, Professional Counselors, Licensed Mental Health Counselors, Marriage and Family Therapists, Social Workers, and Nurses by Commonwealth Educational Seminars

25 CE Credits are approved for Registered Dietitians, Nutritional Therapists, and  Integrative and Functional Nutrition Certified Practitioners by the Integrative & Functional Nutrition Academy.

24 CEU’s are approved by the Nutritional Therapy Association (NTA).

Click here for more information.

There is no known commercial support nor conflict of interest for this program.

Bonus Courses & Book!

🚩Provide these free resources to your clients and enhance your work while improving their outcomes.
🚩Purchase this course and receive a 30-minute bonus course, Preventing and Treating Diabetes Type 2, Naturally, to share with your clients at no charge.
🚩Ebook filled with recipes and self-care you may share with your clients.
🚩A 60-minute bonus course, Nutritional & Integrative Tips During COVID-19, with 10+ best self-care strategies for you & your clients.

Course Curriculum

Module 1: Introduction

  • Introduction to Integrative Medicine and Nutrition (1:09:09) Free Video

Module 2

  • Ethics and Scope of practice (0:44:07)

Module 3

  • The Biology of Diabetes and Alzheimer's (1:55:14)

Module 4

  • The Psychology of Diabetes and Alzheimer's (0:58:05)

Module 5

  • Circadian Rhythms and Hormones (1:09:37)

Module 6

  • Culture, Illness and Awareness (1:18:25)

Module 7

  • Assessment and Evaluation (1:27:45)

Module 8

  • Digestion and Diet (1:37:19)

Module 9

  • Culinary and Spice Medicine (1:54:02)

Module 10

  • Herbal Medicine and Diabetes (2:28:29)

Module 11

  • Nutritional Supplements (2:10:35)

Module 12

  • Pharmaceuticals and their Interactions with Herbal
  • Supplements (1:25:32)

Module 13

  • Exercise and Movement for Diabetes & AD (1:01:46)
  • Home Exercises (0:43:00)

Module 14

  • Somatic and Energy Therapies (1:02:29)
  • Massage and Bodywork for Diabetes & Alzheimer's (1:08:16)

Module 15

  • Detoxification Strategies (1:07:00)

Module 16

  • Self-Care, Self-Regulation, Adherence (0:38:49)

Module 17

  • Protocols & Next Steps (0:49:20)

Module 18

  • Resources

Course Information

  • Who benefits from this course?

    This intermediate-level program is designed for nurses, nurse practitioners, PA’s, PTs, OT’s, psychologists, social workers, marriage and family therapists, professional counselors, nutritionists, massage therapists, Psychiatrists, and others for use in the clinical setting. The course is very accessible to non-professionals with an interest in their own health and well being.

  • Course content
    • Module   1 – Introduction to Integrative Medicine and Nutrition 
    • Module   2 – Ethics and Scope of practice 
    • Module   3 – The Biology of Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s
    • Module   4 – The Psychology of Diabetes, Cognitive Decline and Alzheimer’s
    • Module   5 – Circadian and Ultradian Rhythms and Hormone
    • Module   6 – Culture, Illness, and Awareness
    • Module   7 – Assessment and Evaluation 
    • Module   8 – Digestion and Diet 
    • Module   9 – Culinary and Spice Medicine 
    • Module 10 – Herbal Medicine and Diabetes
    • Module 11 – Nutritional Supplements
    • Module 12 – Pharmaceuticals and their Interactions with Herbs and Supplements
    • Module 13 – Exercise & Movement for Diabetes & AD
    • Module 14 – Somatic and Energy Therapies 
    • Module 15 – Detoxification Strategies 
    • Module 16 – Self-Care, Self-Regulation, Adherence
    • Module 17 – Protocols & Next Steps 
    • Module 18 – Resources
  • What are the course learning objectives?
    1. Describe integrative medicine and functional medicine for diabetes prevention management and treatment.
    2. Describe integrative medicine and functional medicine for cognitive decline and Alzheimer’s prevention management and treatment.
    3. Analyze definitions and terms of reference in the field of practice.
    4. List the benefits of integrative medicine.
    5. Discuss the link between culture and Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM).
    6. Identify the principles of effective treatment.
    7. Apply the spectrum of ethics into clinical practice of integrative medicine.
    8. Assess federal & state laws and scope of practice.
    9. Identify the importance of exploring belief systems in a cultural context.
    10. Describe the role of ethnic identity, practices, physical & mental health in ethics 
    11. Describe Metabolic syndrome (prediabetes) and diabetes, type 1, type 2, and 3.
    12. Describe emerging definitions of diabetes (type 1, 2, gestational and 3).
    13. Identify risk factors and the relationship among them.
    14. Describe metabolic syndrome and insulin resistance.
    15. List complications & comorbidities of diabetes.
    16. Identify the spectrum of cognitive decline & Alzheimer’s development.
    17. Identify the difference between mild, subjective cognitive impairment and AD.
    18. Describe APOE, plaque tangles, and neuroglial inflammation.
    19. Discuss epigenetic and genetic (APOE) vulnerabilities for the development of heart disease, and its relation to diabetes type 3 (dementia) and lifestyle guidelines for prevention.
    20. List how amyloid and Tau are currently understood to affect cognitive function.
    21. Identify how chronic stress affects the immune system.
    22. Discuss how stress can impair the cardiovascular system.
    23. Discuss how stress increases the risk of Alzheimer’s.
    24. Identify the bidirectional effects of psychology & biology.
    25. Discuss the link between diabetes, anxiety, and depression
    26. Discuss the effects of adverse childhood experience, PTSD on health.
    27. Analyze the evidence of insulin resistance and its response to emotion.
    28. Discuss the health risks for caregivers of diabetes and dementia.
    29. Identify strategies for enhancing caregiver stress resilience.
    30. Describe the science of circadian rhythm and its assessment as it contributes to diabetes and AD spectrum.
    31. Describe the role of stress in circadian rhythm disruption.
    32. Describe the effects of a disrupted circadian rhythm on health.
    33. List methods to balance circadian rhythm.
    34. Assess the role of hormones in cognitive performance, diabetes & AD prevention.
    35. List the primary hormones, methods of use, and their interactions.
    36. Explain the evidence of benefits of the use of Bioidentical Hormone Replacement Therapy.
    37. Analyze differentials in prevalence of diabetes & Alzheimer’s across diverse communities.
    38. Identify approaches to cultural competent care.
    39. Describe intervention options in the context of culture and ethnicity.
    40. Identify the importance of identity awareness as a tool to be more efficient with patients.
    41. Demonstrate and interview clients using the DSM5™ Cultural Formulation tool to explore beliefs about diabetes in order to enhance the treatment planning process across cultures.
    42. Describe innovative approaches to diabetes diets and interventions among diverse groups including African Americans, Hispanic individuals, American Indians.
    43. Describe concepts of culinary pedagogy.
    44. Analyze traditional foods and their benefits for health and rapport building.
    45. Assess your client/patient for readiness for diverse Integrative Interventions.
    46. Demonstrate the use of a food mood assessment to evaluate client eating patterns and how those patterns may influence their food behaviors and diabetes progression (Slide 24).
    47. Demonstrate lesser known salivary, stool and hair assessments that will inform dietary and nutritional interventions including Adrenal Stress (cortisol, DHEA), Tissue Mineral Analysis, Gastrointestinal health, Food sensitivities.
    48. Assess circadian rhythm as it contributes to diabetes and AD.
    49. Describe drug-nutrient-herbal interactions for clients in order to prevent side effects of polymedicine use.
    50. Discuss epigenetic and genetic (APOE) vulnerabilities for the development of heart disease, and its relation to diabetes type 3 (dementia) and lifestyle guidelines for prevention.
    51. Assess the role of ACE’s and increased risk of diabetes and AD.
    52. Assess the bi-directional interaction of mental health status on diabetes self-management.
    53. Identify hormones assessment options and their influence on diabetes.
    54. Identify the scientific research that links diverse types of diet diabetes and its implications for treatment.
    55. Explain The BrainBow Blueprint for Diabetes and AD.
    56. Analyze the science  of the “second brain” and its function in the prevention and development of diabetes type 2  and AD.
    57. Identify the Delta Desaturase Enzyme, fat digestion and its meaning for diabetes and diet.
    58. Recite Bioindividual nutritional approaches to diabetes prevention and treatment and why one diet does not fit all?
    59. Identify the link between oxidation of carbohydrates, genetics, culture and diet.
    60. Identify a correlation between the role of food sensitivities and diabetes type 2 and AD.
    61. Identify the role of culinary medicine in addressing hypoglycemia, hyperglycemia, neuropathies and cognitive health.
    62. Identify the application of spices for prevention and treatment of diabetes and AD
    63. Discuss nutritional approaches for preventing and treating metabolic syndrome and diabetes.
    64. Describe nutritional approaches and food preparation methods for preventing and treating AD.
    65. Identify the role of fermented foods in enhancing the second brain.
    66. Describe the role of anti inflammatory spices for prevention of cognitive decline
    67. Identify the culinary application of bio-individual diets Discuss the integration of herbal therapies into treatment protocols for those with diabetes type 2 and 3 diagnosis
    68. Explain evidence-based herbal protocols for approaching the treatment of diabetes type 2.
    69. Explain potential contraindications of herbal medicine in relation to particular populations of patients.
    70. Identify seven herbs that are hypoglycemic in action.
    71. Describe five herbs used for cardiovascular support.
    72. Discuss the use of three herbs for liver health.
    73. Identify herbs for adrenal health as it relates to metabolic disorders.
    74. Identify five herbs that support the nervous system.
    75. Identify three herbs indicated for neuropathy associated with type 2 diabetes.
    76. Explain the use of essential oils as adjuvant therapy.
    77. Describe use of herbal oils and salves as topical treatment for diabetes type 2.
    78. Plan development of herbal protocols for those with diabetes type 2 diagnosis.
    79. Discuss indications and contraindications of the use of diabetes medications and herbal medicines and nutrients.
    80. Identify herbal quality and delivery systems
    81. Explain how specific micronutrients and macronutrients affect blood glucose metabolism inflammation and cognitive function in clients.
    82. Identify the evidence for the use of essential fatty acids for prevention and treatment of metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and AD.
    83. Identify the evidence for the use and dose of essential fatty acids for diabetes.
    84. Assess the evidence for specific nutrient protocols for prevention and treatment of diabetes including glucose management, Diabetic neuropathy, cardiovascular health, blood pressure, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, etc.
    85. Recite nutritional approaches for preventing treating metabolic syndrome.
    86. Describe six foundation nutrients for treating clients who present with diabetes and AD and its sequelae.
    87. Identify multiple ways (oral topical etc.) nutrient absorption can enhance diabetes outcomes.
    88. Describe Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics.
    89. Describe synergy and additive effects.
    90. Analyze drug/Nutrient/Herb interactions in Diabetes and AD.
    91. Identify the research on the side effects of diabetes medications and the role of nutrition and herbal medicines.
    92. Identify the research on side effects of AD medications and the role of nutrition and herbal medicines.
    93. Describe Nootropic medications.
    94. Describe the role of IV therapy.
    95. Analyze the controversies about the use of statins.
    96. Demonstrate methods to reduce and eliminating pharmaceuticals is possible.
    97. Compile research on anaerobic, aerobic exercise, and self-care methods to reduce insulin resistance, improve cardiac function and reduce pain in diabetes.
    98. Demonstrate the role of right hemisphere left hemisphere coordination exercises for cog function and AD.
    99. Demonstrate specific stretch exercises for the spectrum of diabetes. 
    100. Describe specific ways for a client to create a home gym and undertake exercise at all stages of function.fx
    101. Demonstrate breathing and simple chair yoga exercises designed specifically for diabetes type 2 and its sequelae.
    102. Demonstrate a  Guided visualization exercise and provide an audio Diabetes Guided Relaxation Audio to reduce stress.
    103. Identify the evidence for the role of Manual Therapies, and Electro-therapeutic/stimulation interventions for diabetes and AD.
    104. Describe Manual therapies in glucose control, mood lability, edema, relaxation, and pain management.
    105. Demonstrate a Massage therapy Protocol Treatment for Diabetes.
    106. Discuss the role of skin brushing and the Lymphatic system to reduce edema.
    107. Demonstrate a self-massage therapy Protocol Treatment for clients with diabetes.
    108. Describe Topical herbal massage oils for use in foot care in diabetes.
    109. Assess the evidence for acupuncture and acupressure in diabetes.
    110. Describe evidence for use of Cranial Electrical stimulation for diabetic neuropathies.
    111. Identify Hydrotherapies for diabetes including, use of warm and cool water for pain, stimulation mood, foot soaks, tub soaks, delivery of minerals and relaxation.
    112. Identify the science of toxins and their role in diabetes and AD.
    113. Analyze the purpose of Detoxification, also called Biotransformation.
    114. Identify Detoxification Strategies
    115. Analyze the role of detoxification in culture and religion.
    116. Explain Phase 1, 2 & 3 Liver detoxification.
    117. Identify P450 enzymes and their role in drug and herb metabolism.
    118. Explain how to enhance liver function and fat metabolism, with detoxification strategies at all stages of prevention and treatment.
    119. Describe tailoring lifestyle changes for clients that enhance self-care strategies and success.
    120. Assess readiness for change through different motivational strategies.
    121. Describe strategies to overcome obstacles to program adherence.
    122. Identify learned helplessness and depression as it contributes to lack of self care.
    123. Describe methods to Motivating change in patients and family members.
    124. Identify strategies for affordability and access of resources.
    125. Critique concepts of social justice and community health.
    126. Design integrative protocols to treat diabetes and most common comorbidities, AD and cognitive decline.
  • Selected references

    American Diabetes Association. (2017). Standards of medical care in diabetes—2017: Summary of revisions. Diabetes Care, 40(Supplement 1): S4-S5. Retrieved fromhttps://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/40/Supplement_1/S4.full-text.pdf

    Beatty, D. L., Hall, M. H., Kamarck, T. A., Buysse, D. J., Owens, J. F., Reis, S. E. Matthews, K. A. (2011). Unfair treatment is associated with poor sleep in African American and Caucasian adults: Pittsburgh Sleep SCORE project. Health Psychology, 30(3), 351-9. doi:10.1037/a0022976​

    Chatterjee, S., Khunti, K., & Davies, M. J. (2017). Type 2 diabetes. Lancet, 389(10085), 2239-2251. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(17)30058-2. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28190580​

    Chia, J. S. J., McRae, J. L., Kukuljan, S., Woodford, K., Elliott, R. B., Swinburn, B., & Dwyer, K. M. (2017). A1 beta-casein milk protein and other environmental pre-disposing factors for type 1 diabetes. Nutrition & Diabetes, 7(5), e274. doi:10.1038/nutd.2017.16. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28504710

    Choi, S., Kim, K., Chang, J., Kim, S. M., Kim, S. J., Cho, H.-J., & Park, S. M. (2019). Association of chronic periodontitis on alzheimer’s disease or vascular dementia. Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, 67(6), 1234-1239. Retrieved from https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/jgs.15828

    Cornell, S. (2015).​ Continual evolution of type 2 diabetes: An update on pathophysiology and emerging treatment options. Therapeutics and Clinical Risk Management, 11, 621–632.doi:10.2147/TCRM.S67387. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4404882

    Defronzo, R. A., Ferrannini, E., Groop, L., Henry, R. R., Herman, W. H., Holst, J. J., … Weiss, R. (2015). Type 2 diabetes mellitus. Nature Reviews Disease Primers, 1(15019).
    Retrieved from https://www.nature.com/articles/nrdp201519​

    Ferrara, A., Karter, A. J., Ackerson, L. M., Liu, J. Y., & Selby, J. V. (2001). Hormone replacement therapy is associated with better glycemic control in women with type 2 diabetes​. Diabetes Care, 24(7), 1144-1150. Retrieved from https://care.diabetesjournals.org/content/24/7/1144​

    Handley, Margaret A., Judy Quan, PhD, Maria T. Chao, DrPH, Neda Ratanawongsa, MD, MPH, Urmimala Sarkar, MD, MPH, Sophia Emmons-Bell and Dean Schillinger, MDJ Use of Complementary Health Approaches Among Diverse Primary Care Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Association with Cardiometabolic Outcomes: From the SF Bay Collaborative Research Network (SF Bay CRN) Am Board Fam Med September-October 2017vol. 30 no. 5 624-631

    Hicken, M. T., Lee, H., Ailshire, J., Burgard, S. A., & Williams, D. R. (2013). “Every shut eye, ain’t sleep”: The role of racism-related vigilance in racial/ethnic disparities in sleep difficulty. Race and Social Problems, 5, 100. doi:10.1007/s12552-013-9095-9​

    Hurtado, M. D., & Vella, A. (2019). What is type 2 diabetes? Medicine, 47(1), 10-15. Retrieved from​ https://www.medicinejournal.co.uk/article/S1357-3039(18)30270-6/pdf

    Korn, L. E., Logsdon, R. G., Polissar, N. L., Gomez-Beloz, A., Waters, T., & Ryser, R. (2009A randomized trial of a CAM therapy for stress reduction in American Indian and Alaskan Native family caregivers. The Gerontologist, 49(3), 368-377.

    Korn, L., & Ryser, R. (2009, May 1). Salish culture, foods and medicines: Indigenous traditions and CAM for the prevention and treatment of diabetes type 2. Townsend Letter. Retrieved from https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Salish+culture,+foods+and+medicines%3A+indigenous+traditions+and+CAM…-a0198715577

    Korn, L. (2014). Burying the umbilicus: Traditional medicine on the west coast of Mexico. Fourth World Journal, 13(1), 5-31.

    Korn, L. (2014). La costumbre de enterrar el cordón umbilical (Burying the Umbilicus). Fourth World Journal, 13(1), 33-58.

    Korn, L. E. (2013). Somatic empathy: Restoring community health with massage. Fourth World Journal, 12(1), 19-28.

    Korn, L., Ryser, R. (2009). Preventing and treating diabetes naturally: The native way. Olympia, WA: Daykeeper Press.

    Rewers, M., & Ludvigsson, J. (2016). Environmental risk factors for type 1 diabetes. Lancet, 387(10035), 2340-2348. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(16)30507-4. Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27302273

    Tomfohra, L., Pung, M., Edwards, K. M., Dimsdalea, J. E. (2012). Racial differences in sleep architecture: The role of ethnic discrimination. Biological Psychology, 89(1), 34–38​.

    Wu, K. L., Rayner, C. K., Chuah, S. K., Changchien, C. S., Lu, S. N., Chiu, Y. C., … Lee, C. M. (2008). Effects of ginger on gastric emptying and motility in healthy humans. European Journal of Gastroenterology & Hepatology 2008 May;20(5):436-40. doi: 10.1097/MEG.0b013e3282f4b224.

    Yeh, Gloria Y. David M. Eisenberg, Roger B. Davis, Russell S. Phillips, “Use of Complementary and Alternative Medicine Among Persons With Diabetes Mellitus: Results of a National Survey”, American Journal of Public Health 92, no. 10 (October 1, 2002): pp. 1648-1652.

  • How to become certified

    Certification is awarded to licensed clinicians and health professionals. Once you complete the 25-hour course and receive your certificate you will submit your certificate and proof of license here.

  • When does the course start and finish?

    The course starts now and never ends! It is a completely self-paced online course – you decide when you start and when you finish.

  • How long do I have access to the course?

    How does lifetime access sound? After enrolling, you have unlimited access to this course for as long as you like – across any and all devices you own.

  • What if I am unhappy with the course?

    If you are not 100% satisfied with this course you may send an email and you will be provided with a full refund, no questions asked.

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